C++ Design Generic Programming ebook free download

 

C++ Design Generic Programming ebook free download

C++ Design Generic Programming ebook free download

C++ Design Generic Programming ebook free download

C++ Design Generic Programming ebook free download

Author:

Andrei Alexandrescu

Book Description:

Modern C++ Design: Generic Programming and Design Patterns Applied
By Andrei Alexandrescu
Publisher : Addison Wesley
Pub Date : February 01, 2001
ISBN: 0-201-70431-5
Pages : 352

In Modern C++ Design, Andrei Alexandrescu opens new vistas for C++ software engineers. Showing uncommon imagination and virtuosity, Alexandrescu offers a bleeding edge way to deal with programming plan that unites outline designs, non specific programming, and C++, empowering software engineers to attain to expressive, adaptable, and exceedingly reusable code. The book presents the idea of nonexclusive parts, reusable configuration formats that empower a less demanding and more consistent move from outline to application code, produce code that better communicates the first plan proposition, and bolster the reuse of configuration structures with insignificant recoding. The creator then demonstrates to apply this way to deal with repeating, genuine issues that C++ software engineers confront in their everyday action. All code is accessible on the Web, alongside Alexandrescu’s downloadable Loki C++ library, which gives effective out-of-the-case usefulness for basically any C++ venture. For experienced C++ developers who have in any event some commonality with the Standard Template Library (STL).

Contents:

Part I: Techniques……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 1
Chapter 1. Policy-Based Class Design………………………………………………………………… 2
1.1 The Multiplicity of Software Design ……………………………………………………………. 2
1.2 The Failure of the Do-It-All Interface ………………………………………………………….. 3
1.3 Multiple Inheritance to the Rescue? …………………………………………………………… 4
1.4 The Benefit of Templates …………………………………………………………………………… 5
1.5 Policies and Policy Classes ……………………………………………………………………….. 6
1.6 Enriched Policies ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 9
1.7 Destructors of Policy Classes…………………………………………………………………… 10
1.8 Optional Functionality Through Incomplete Instantiation………………………….. 11
1.9 Combining Policy Classes………………………………………………………………………… 12
1.10 Customizing Structure with Policy Classes…………………………………………….. 13
1.11 Compatible and Incompatible Policies……………………………………………………. 14
1.12 Decomposing a Class into Policies ………………………………………………………… 16
1.13 Summary ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 17
Chapter 2. Techniques ………………………………………………………………………………………. 19
2.1 Compile-Time Assertions …………………………………………………………………………. 19
2.2 Partial Template Specialization………………………………………………………………… 22
2.3 Local Classes…………………………………………………………………………………………… 23
2.4 Mapping Integral Constants to Types ………………………………………………………. 24
2.5 Type-to-Type Mapping……………………………………………………………………………… 26
2.6 Type Selection …………………………………………………………………………………………. 28
2.7 Detecting Convertibility and Inheritance at Compile Time ………………………… 29
2.8 A Wrapper Around type_info……………………………………………………………….. 32
2.9 NullType and EmptyType…………………………………………………………………….. 34
2.10 Type Traits …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 34
2.11 Summary ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 40
Chapter 3. Typelists …………………………………………………………………………………………… 42
3.1 The Need for Typelists……………………………………………………………………………… 42
3.2 Defining Typelists …………………………………………………………………………………….. 43
3.3 Linearizing Typelist Creation ……………………………………………………………………. 45
3.4 Calculating Length……………………………………………………………………………………. 45
3.5 Intermezzo……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 46
3.6 Indexed Access ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 47
3.7 Searching Typelists………………………………………………………………………………….. 48
3.8 Appending to Typelists …………………………………………………………………………….. 49
3.9 Erasing a Type from a Typelist…………………………………………………………………. 50
3.10 Erasing Duplicates …………………………………………………………………………………. 51
3.11 Replacing an Element in a Typelist ………………………………………………………… 52
3.12 Partially Ordering Typelists…………………………………………………………………….. 53
3.13 Class Generation with Typelists……………………………………………………………… 56
3.14 Summary ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 65
3.15 Typelist Quick Facts ………………………………………………………………………….. 66
Chapter 4. Small-Object Allocation…………………………………………………………………….. 68
4.1 The Default Free Store Allocator ……………………………………………………………… 68
4.2 The Workings of a Memory Allocator ……………………………………………………….. 69
4.3 A Small-Object Allocator ………………………………………………………………………….. 70
4.4 Chunks ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 71
4.5 The Fixed-Size Allocator ………………………………………………………………………….. 74
4.6 The SmallObjAllocator Class……………………………………………………………. 77
4.7 A Hat Trick……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 79
4.8 Simple, Complicated, Yet Simple in the End…………………………………………….. 81
4.9 Administrivia…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 82
4.10 Summary ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 83
4.11 Small-Object Allocator Quick Facts………………………………………………………… 83
Part II: Components……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 85
Chapter 5. Generalized Functors……………………………………………………………………….. 86
5.1 The Command Design Pattern…………………………………………………………………. 86
5.2 Command in the Real World…………………………………………………………………….. 89
5.3 C++ Callable Entities ……………………………………………………………………………….. 89
5.4 The Functor Class Template Skeleton ………………………………………………….. 91
5.5 Implementing the Forwarding Functor::operator() …………………………. 95
5.6 Handling Functors ……………………………………………………………………………………. 96
5.7 Build One, Get One Free………………………………………………………………………….. 98
5.8 Argument and Return Type Conversions …………………………………………………. 99
5.9 Handling Pointers to Member Functions…………………………………………………. 101
5.10 Binding …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 104
5.11 Chaining Requests……………………………………………………………………………….. 106
5.12 Real-World Issues I: The Cost of Forwarding Functions ………………………. 107
5.13 Real-World Issues II: Heap Allocation ………………………………………………….. 108
5.14 Implementing Undo and Redo with Functor ………………………………………. 110
5.15 Summary ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 110
5.16 Functor Quick Facts…………………………………………………………………………… 111
Chapter 6. Implementing Singletons ………………………………………………………………… 113
6.1 Static Data + Static Functions != Singleton…………………………………………….. 113
6.2 The Basic C++ Idioms Supporting Singletons ………………………………………… 114
6.3 Enforcing the Singleton’s Uniqueness ……………………………………………………. 116
6.4 Destroying the Singleton ………………………………………………………………………… 116
6.5 The Dead Reference Problem………………………………………………………………… 118
6.6 Addressing the Dead Reference Problem (I): The Phoenix Singleton…….. 120
6.7 Addressing the Dead Reference Problem (II): Singletons with Longevity.. 122
6.8 Implementing Singletons with Longevity…………………………………………………. 125
6.9 Living in a Multithreaded World………………………………………………………………. 128
6.10 Putting It All Together …………………………………………………………………………… 130
6.11 Working with SingletonHolder………………………………………………………… 134
6.12 Summary ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 136
6.13 SingletonHolder Class Template Quick Facts………………………………… 136
Chapter 7. Smart Pointers………………………………………………………………………………… 138
7.1 Smart Pointers 101 ………………………………………………………………………………… 138
7.2 The Deal ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 139
7.3 Storage of Smart Pointers………………………………………………………………………. 140
7.4 Smart Pointer Member Functions …………………………………………………………… 142
7.5 Ownership-Handling Strategies ……………………………………………………………… 143
7.6 The Address-of Operator………………………………………………………………………… 150
7.7 Implicit Conversion to Raw Pointer Types………………………………………………. 151
7.8 Equality and Inequality……………………………………………………………………………. 153
7.9 Ordering Comparisons……………………………………………………………………………. 157
7.10 Checking and Error Reporting………………………………………………………………. 159
7.11 Smart Pointers to const and const Smart Pointers …………………………… 161
7.12 Arrays…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 161
7.13 Smart Pointers and Multithreading ……………………………………………………….. 162
7.14 Putting It All Together …………………………………………………………………………… 165
7.15 Summary ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 171
7.16 SmartPtr Quick Facts ………………………………………………………………………… 171
Chapter 8. Object Factories……………………………………………………………………………… 173
8.1 The Need for Object Factories ……………………………………………………………….. 174
8.2 Object Factories in C++: Classes and Objects……………………………………….. 175
8.3 Implementing an Object Factory …………………………………………………………….. 176
8.4 Type Identifiers ………………………………………………………………………………………. 180
8.5 Generalization………………………………………………………………………………………… 181
8.6 Minutiae………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 184
8.7 Clone Factories………………………………………………………………………………………. 185
8.8 Using Object Factories with Other Generic Components ……………………….. 188
8.9 Summary………………………………………………………………………………………………… 189
8.10 Factory Class Template Quick Facts…………………………………………………. 189
8.11 CloneFactory Class Template Quick Facts………………………………………. 190
Chapter 9. Abstract Factory……………………………………………………………………………… 191
9.1 The Architectural Role of Abstract Factory……………………………………………… 191
9.2 A Generic Abstract Factory Interface ……………………………………………………… 193
9.3 Implementing AbstractFactory…………………………………………………………. 196
9.4 A Prototype-Based Abstract Factory Implementation……………………………… 199
9.5 Summary………………………………………………………………………………………………… 202
9.6 AbstractFactory and ConcreteFactory Quick Facts……………………. 203
Chapter 10. Visitor……………………………………………………………………………………………. 205
10.1 Visitor Basics ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 205
10.2 Overloading and the Catch-All Function……………………………………………….. 210
10.3 An Implementation Refinement: The Acyclic Visitor……………………………… 211
10.4 A Generic Implementation of Visitor……………………………………………………… 215
10.5 Back to the “Cyclic” Visitor……………………………………………………………………. 221
10.6 Hooking Variations……………………………………………………………………………….. 223
10.7 Summary ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 226
10.8 Visitor Generic Components Quick Facts …………………………………………….. 226
Chapter 11. Multimethods………………………………………………………………………………… 228
11.1 What Are Multimethods?………………………………………………………………………. 228
11.2 When Are Multimethods Needed?………………………………………………………… 229
11.3 Double Switch-on-Type: Brute Force……………………………………………………. 230
11.4 The Brute-Force Approach Automated…………………………………………………. 232
11.5 Symmetry with the Brute-Force Dispatcher ………………………………………….. 237
11.6 The Logarithmic Double Dispatcher……………………………………………………… 240
11.7 FnDispatcher and Symmetry……………………………………………………………. 245
11.8 Double Dispatch to Functors ………………………………………………………………… 246
11.9 Converting Arguments: static_cast or dynamic_cast?………………… 248
11.10 Constant-Time Multimethods: Raw Speed …………………………………………. 252
11.11 BasicDispatcher and BasicFastDispatcher as Policies…………. 255
11.12 Looking Forward ………………………………………………………………………………… 257
11.13 Summary ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 258
11.14 Double Dispatcher Quick Facts ………………………………………………………….. 259
Appendix A. A Minimalist Multithreading Library ………………………………………………. 262
A.1 A Critique of Multithreading ……………………………………………………………………. 262
A.2 Loki’s Approach……………………………………………………………………………………… 263
A.3 Atomic Operations on Integral Types …………………………………………………….. 264
A.4 Mutexes …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 265
A.5 Locking Semantics in Object-Oriented Programming …………………………….. 267
A.6 Optional volatile Modifier………………………………………………………………….. 269
A.7 Semaphores, Events, and Other Good Things ………………………………………. 269
A.8 Summary ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 269
Bibliography……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 270

C++ Design Generic Programming ebook free download

Crash Course Metabolism and Nutrition ebook free download pdf

C++ Design Generic Programming ebook free download

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*